Chapter 23: Energy Production and Storage

Your body must produce and store enough energy in order to do even the most minimal daily activities, including just getting out of bed. When you wake up to the buzzing alarm to get ready for work, how do you feel? Are you groggy and sluggish? Do you have to force yourself out of bed in order to get ready for work? If you answered yes, you are not alone. More often than not, most everybody has this experience. It seems your body just doesn’t have enough energy to get going.

Fast-forward a few hours. No matter what type of job you have, you must feed your body to have enough energy to perform your job duties. If you do manual labor, you need enough energy to move things around, or lift things, or run machinery. You even need a small amount of energy to push a pencil if you work at an office. Pencil pushing, studying, writing checks, driving, sitting, and other things of that nature also require energy, just a different type than that which is used for physical labor.

How does your body produce energy? One way is to convert food into energy, but a lesser known way is through our joints. Doing exercises that involve the movement of your joints creates energy. Let’s look at running again. Many of the joints in your body are active and being moved. For example, your shoulder joints move when you swing your arms back and forth while running. Your ankle joints move with your feet. Your ball and hip joints move, as do the joints in your knees. Using more of your joints through exercise also results in increased flexibility. The more they are used, the stronger they become, and the more flexible they become.

Joints are key in healing your body, because they produce electrical energy. This has been proven scientifically. In fact, there was once a study done on various animals that had damaged organs. The researchers determined that when the organs started to heal, electrical activity was the first thing present in the healing process. Then, the cells followed along and started to heal, and regenerate.

Practicing Ki-gong breathing is the second part of creating energy. When you practice the breathing exercises in Chapter 21, you can feel an electrical stimulation in your body. It takes practice to feel this, because Ki-gong exercises, like all exercises, take time for people to perfect. Once your technique develops, you will notice something very interesting. You will experience electrical energy in your hands and arms, which feels similar to when your arm gets tingly when it falls asleep. Another common sensation is itchiness in your limbs, as they become warm, or even moist. That is the electrical energy being produced by your body.

If you are in a poor state of health, you will not feel this right away, but you will feel it when your body starts to heal from doing the breathing exercises. If you start yawning, for example, or your eyes water, this means your digestive function is improving because your body is expelling impurities. So, the faster you can feel the stimulation, the faster your body will get into a healthy state.

Which area of your body uses the most electrical energy? It would be the heart. All of the blood vessels and nerves leading to and from it carry a tiny amount of electrical energy. Let’s put this into easy-to-understand-terms. The heart is the fuse- box of your body, and the vessels and nerves are all of the house wires that feed off of it. When we get older, our nervous system slows down. This results in a decrease in our reaction time to outside stimuli, and our reflexes eventually slow to a crawl. Our coordination suffers as well, and our bones become stiff. If we fall down, there is a good chance that we will break the area between our leg and hip bone.

Studies have shown that when the elderly break this area, they die within three years.1 The area cannot heal because their body has a poor capillary system, so there is poor blood flow. Without good blood flow, regeneration of the area is impossible. Plus, the person cannot move enough to create the energy in the joint areas necessary for healing. Therefore, you must move your joints as much as possible to promote the healing function. People who live to be 100 move around a lot. Many do some sort of labor, like agricultural work. They work their joints, and as a result, are healthy. If you do not do some type of manual labor or exercise, then you should stretch, jog, or practice Darimar Ki-gong.

As we discussed before, our joints, if used, create energy. Proper breathing also stimulates energy flow. Therefore, if we breathe properly while exercising, our energy levels will increase exponentially.

When you practice Darimar Ki-Gong, you will notice that your body will start to relax. You will know you are properly breathing because you will experience side-effects, such as watering eyes, itchy and warm palms, salivating. Then, you will experience your brain becoming clearer. The body and mind work together, and create an energy field. The body has nerves for excitement, and nerves for calming down. They become balanced with the energy field.

Grandmaster Darim Jang, stretching using (2) chairs, NJ 1990
Grandmaster Darim Jang, stretching using (2) chairs, NJ 1990
Grandmaster Darim Jang, standing stretching, NJ 1990
Grandmaster Darim Jang, standing stretching, NJ 1990
Grandmaster Darim Jang, Tornado kick targeting a can of Coke on top of the head, NJ 1990
Grandmaster Darim Jang, Tornado kick targeting a can of Coke on top of the head, NJ 1990
Tornado kick, kicking apple from top of head, New Jersey, 1991
Tornado kick, kicking apple from top of head, New Jersey, 1991

  1. See Hip Fractures Among Older Adults. At least 250,000 older people are hospitalized for hip fractures or breaks in the United States each year. In 2013, the direct medical cost (pay by the patient and their insurance companies) for such falls totaled $34 billion.

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