Chapter 13: The Water Pathway

When we hit middle age, it is common to experience fat accumulation in the stomach area. Why? One reason is because we don’t drink as much water. A child’s body is 75% water.1 Later in life, the amount of water we have in our body is reduced. After reaching 30 years of age, we start gaining fat first in our thighs, then the stomach, next is the chest, moving to the arms, lower legs, and finally the face. If we look at the body as a whole, when we get older and don’t take care of ourselves like we should, we have a thick trunk area. I call this a turtle or spider shape. This shape is a prelude to illness.

Low amounts of water in our body reduces our muscle mass. The muscle’s function is to store glucose, water, protein and fat. Reduced water in the body means protein and fat are also reduced in the muscles, which decreases the amount of muscle mass we have. Where do protein, fat, and glucose go when we get older? As you may have guessed, they fill in the stomach area.

Let’s compare our body’s water pathway to nature. In nature, whether water comes from the clouds or rivers or streams, it all flows, in some capacity, into the ground. Most states that have a hot climate use subterranean (underground) water for watering agriculture. This is because there is not a lot of ground water due to so much heat. The heat evaporates what little water there is and the land becomes very dry. What little bit of rain that falls goes straight into the soil. Having no water above ground means water must be obtained below the ground. This is done by digging wells. For the sake of simplicity, let’s assume wells are 100 feet deep. If a well dries up due to the climate, what can be done? The only way to tap into more water is to make the holes deeper and deeper, and wider and wider, and add more wells. The side effect is that the land these wells are dug into slowly dwindles in size. Currently, some hotter states have restricted the size of land for growing agriculture because of this. More land is needed to drill more wells and farmers are forced to use less land to grow produce. Due to how many cities are being built or expanded upon, there is just not enough water. In fact, Los Angeles discourages people from having grass because it requires so much water. The city even gives people money as incentive not to grow it. Texas wanted to solve their water problem by building a pipeline to Lake Erie and diverting much of the lake’s water.

It is the same in the human body. We have water flowing in our bodies, much like an underground river. If the water flow is good, our bodies are nourished and we are healthy. We must have water to survive because our bodies are made up mostly of water. Among other things, water is in our blood, tears, urine, saliva, sweat, and sperm. These are all moist. Each and every one of our cells needs water to survive. Their mitochondria contain water and use it to create Adenosine Triphosphate (ADT.) This step is very important because our survival depends on ATP. It is the molecule that stores the energy we need to function every day. It fuels our brain cells and contracts our muscles. To create it, we need glucose and water. So, in order to have a large store of energy, we must build up a water reserve in our body. How do we do this?

The amount of water our body uses must be in proportion to the amount of water we take into our body. If they are not balanced, we will have chronic dehydration. People who work in modern metropolitan areas frequently suffer from this level of dehydration. Why? Because they are pummeled with so many alternatives to water. For example, they may drink beer, ice coffee, coffee, soft drinks, and juices. They assume that because these things are liquid, they contain a lot of water. Yes, these things are wet, but there is not much usable water in them. They have a diuretic effect on the body. This means that the non-water products in the drinks actually pull out water from our body when ingested. Additionally, because most of the above-mentioned drinks are sweet, our body produces insulin to get rid of the sweetness via urine. The more we drink these beverages, the more dehydrated we get. The more we drink, the more we want because we are attracted to the sweetness. So, we keep chasing after them. Then, our body creates insulin (in response to the sugar), we urinate, and then become even more dehydrated. Upon feeling thirsty, we drink more sodas and the cycle endlessly repeats itself.

There are symptoms that point to or indicate Chronic Dehydration. First, our metabolism slows down, causing an increase in fatigue. The body burns calories at a slower rate. This is why overweight people can drink tons of diet soda and still not lose weight. The second symptom is that plaque accumulates in our blood vessels. We have already discussed the problems associated with unclean blood vessels (strokes, heart attacks, etc.). After reaching adulthood, our bodies become drier. This is because the water ratio in our body is reduced. Water ratio is the amount of water in your body as compared to your weight. In children, 85% of their body weight is water. If the child weighs 100 pounds, water makes up 85% of his or her weight. In a young adult, 70% of his or her weight is water. From age 65 and up, men have only 50% water weight and women only have 45% water weight. Before death, our bodies are only 40% water.

Before we die, we usually weigh less than we did when we were younger, and our body is usually smaller and colder than it was in our twenties. As we get older, our bodies store away less and less water. This is because we have less muscle mass as we age. In addition, the flexibility function is down. That means that our muscles become fibrous and stiff. There is hardness in the muscles and they can no longer absorb and reserve water.

As we age, we accumulate fat in stomachs. Remember, fat does not mix with water, which means the water reserve in the body is poor. Put olive oil in water and what happens? It separates from the water. A big belly means there is lots of fat in our intestines. How does water get into our body? Through our intestines. Therefore, if there is fat in the intestines, water cannot get through. When water does get through, very little is stored because of the fat. A high percentage of fat repels water and our cells become dehydrated.

Poor water storage brings about problems. First, the digestion pathway of the body becomes dry. Digestion begins in our mouth, when the saliva starts to break down the food. If the saliva has dried up, this initial breakdown cannot occur. The food goes from the mouth to the stomach to the intestines. The nutrients of the food we eat cannot be absorbed by the body, nor can the foods’ moisture. In women, this causes vaginal dryness because of the loss of moisture. In both men and women, the joints and discs in the body become dry.

Dehydration in the body leads to many diseases and, ultimately, death. Every organ in the body shrinks and eventually stops functioning properly. Compare an organ to an apple. If you cut open a fresh apple, it is moist inside and its flesh has a nice color to it. This is a young person’s organ. Now, look at an apple you bought two weeks ago and forgot about. If you cut it open, it is dry inside and the flesh color is dull. This is an old person’s organ. A young person has healthy, pink colored organs. An elderly person may have grayish colored organs. This is all because of the varying water ratios at different ages.

Let’s get back to nature for a moment. If a river floods, it flows faster because it contains so much water. You can’t see what is in the river. When there is a drought, the existing water flows slowly because the water level is lower. We can see all of the trash in it and around it, such as sticks, leafs, and man-made material. The same for our blood vessels. If we take in lots of clean water, our blood flows fast through their vessels and there is a healthy level of blood in our body. If we take in poor quality water, then the blood flows slowly and contains a lot of trash, such as plaque, cholesterol, and triglycerides. The blood becomes sticky. If these things happen in the blood vessels, you have a heart attack. If the blood vessels leading to or away from the brain contain trash, you can have a stroke. So, if the water in the body is of poor quality, we experience dry skin, poor saliva production, and poor digestion, along with more serious ailments. To fend these things off, you must control your water reserve and keep it clean. By doing so, you will slow your body’s aging process.

The water reserve in women is less than in men because, generally speaking, their bodies are smaller. A young woman’s face is usually clear and bright, even if she doesn’t wear makeup. Her body has a healthy amount of water in it. But, after menopause, her face color becomes duller. Women generally have less muscle and more fat than men. This means that they cannot store as much water.

Fat’s function is to regenerate cells within the body. This is very important. If women have too much fat, their reproduction system is greatly affected. Once a girl’s fat ratio is great enough, she will start menstruation.

Years ago, a girl’s first menstruation used to be around high school age. Now, it starts much younger, maybe even as early as the first or second grade. This is due to children eating so many sweet foods. The unused glucose eventually turns into fat, causing increased obesity in today’s young children. Extra fat in an overweight girl’s body signals that she has enough stored energy to reproduce. This causes the menstruation cycle to start earlier. Furthermore, the chicken and beef that we eat contain large amounts of hormones. These hormones also trigger early development in young girls.

Overweight women also have very little water flow in their bodies because of their high fat ratio. High fat is needed for menstruation; therefore, menstruation leads to a decrease in water storage. In general, women expend more water than men because they menstruate and they store less water than men because they have less muscle.

Menopause is when menstruation ends. It signals that the water reserve has dried up. After menopause, the cells age faster and are unable take in as much water. This makes the body drier. To avoid this lack of water, we all have to take in more water by drinking and eating the proper liquids and foods. If we have healthy cells, they will make room for good water. But if they aren’t healthy, we will experience dehydration all over again. Keep your body healthy by supplying it with plenty of good, clean water.

Grandmaster Jang: This demonstration is of a jumping back spin kick, breaking four wood boards. Note: the wood boards are held on one side, instead of two hands on each side. This adds more degree of difficulty to the break since there is less resistance. OH 2006
Grandmaster Jang: This demonstration is of a jumping back spin kick, breaking four wood boards. Note: the wood boards are held on one side, instead of two hands on each side. This adds more degree of difficulty to the break since there is less resistance. OH 2006
Grandmaster Jang: This demonstration is of a jumping back spin kick, breaking four wood boards. Note: the wood boards are held on one side, instead of two hands on each side. This adds more degree of difficulty to the break since there is less resistance. OH 2006
Grandmaster Jang: This demonstration is of a jumping back spin kick, breaking four wood boards. Note: the wood boards are held on one side, instead of two hands on each side. This adds more degree of difficulty to the break since there is less resistance. OH 2006
Grandmaster Jang: This demonstration is of a jumping back spin kick, breaking four wood boards. Note: the wood boards are held on one side, instead of two hands on each side. This adds more degree of difficulty to the break since there is less resistance. OH 2006
Grandmaster Jang: This demonstration is of a jumping back spin kick, breaking four wood boards. Note: the wood boards are held on one side, instead of two hands on each side. This adds more degree of difficulty to the break since there is less resistance. OH 2006

  1. See Born Wet, Human Babies Are 75 Percent Water. Then Comes The Drying for more information about the percentage of water in the human body. “Adult men are about 60 percent water, adult women 55 percent. Elderly people are roughly half water.”

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